An open discussion on what everyone is currently reading. Make recommendations to others, discuss what is new, hot, bestsellers, anything and everything related to books and the authors.

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Recently relaxing with a number of P.G. Wodehouse works (while researching a potential project on Winston Churchill)  and now thoroughly enjoying Robert Graves's "Good-bye to All That."
Tony Kenrick's CHINA WHITE from the early eighties. Seems pretty good so far. Hardboiled adventure thriller.
I'm back to reading Sjowall and Wahloo, the Swedes who started it all. This one is COP KILLER. The books are very good police procedurals. I'm noticing for the first time the social agenda, but somehow it doesn't bother me. I take it for complaints by the characters. We all have things to complain about. The books are amazingly modern.

The last stuff I read wasn't crime fiction - sorry?

 

I'm currently, for more than the 1st time,  going through my collection of over 40 different Dan Marlowe books of varying length, one after the other, in published order.  I know quite a bit about him (he was my father's best friend) and it's fascinating yet heartbreaking to see what life and the publishing business did to Dan.  "The Name of the Game is Death"  his 7th published novel was according to Stephen KIng "a Classic" (King dedicated a novel to Dan) & I say not bad for a kid who was a B at best English student in grade school.  A few very good novels after that and then, unfortunately, all down hill.  He ended up writing tiny 30 page booklets for young kids and problem readers.  Certainly not the way a man, who left a square life behind in his mid 40's, moved to a room in NYC & for the next 30 odd years of his life did almost nothing but pound a typewriter, would want to end up.  When his wife died suddenly just before his move to New York, writing gave Dan something to live for--and then just as suddenly success took it away. 

 

Adrian McKinty's Falling Glass.  His books should come with a warning about catching up on your sleep before you start.  They are very very hard to put down once you start and have a tendency to keep me up way later than I should be awake.
I've just finished Tara Moss' Siren. Definitely not the ending I was expecting. Interweaves a few crimes and has the heroine come to a corner in the series.

Hi, I'm reading "The Last Good Kiss" by James Crumley. After that I have Tami Hoag's "Deeper Than the Dead." Shes's a first time author for me.

I hope everyone is having a good day.

 

Penny

 

 

Picked up James Patterson's Tenth Anniversary. The tenth in his Women's Murder Club series. I know a lot of people are down on him, but I do enjoy this series. And a lightening fast pace is a nice change of pace.

 

David DeLee

Fatal Destiny - a Grace deHaviland Novel

Just finished Dennis Lehane, MOONLIGHT MILE. This is my third Lehane in some 10 years.  God knows, I keep trying. The other two were GONE, BABY, GONE  and SHUTTER ISLAND. I fail to understand the astonishing rise of this author, both in sales and critical acclaim. Mind you, I don't hate the books.  I wouldn't have read them if I did.  It's just that they didn't impress me all that much.  Midlist.  Though I shouldn't say that. There are more good writers on midlist than anywhere else. MOONLIGHT MILE, has the predictable things: the down-and-out private investigator with a vulnerable young family and a mission to save endangered teen girls and their babies. It's a thriller (that accounts to some extent for sales), and as such it has an ending of grandiose violence.  Bodies litter the country side. Nobody seems to care as long as the victim's and the P.I. and helpers get out unharmed. Doesn't anyone wonder who cleans up after thrillers end?
THE PACK, Jason Starr's latest. Due out soon, I think. Pretty good, very funny in places (I think Starr does a Duane Swierczynski imitation on purpose in one scene), and there are scenes of Starr at his best, but there's some padding in writing and I kinda wish Jason would go back to his former 220-page books. Still highly recommended.
I seem to have become somewhat stuck in the past... started off with Sulari Gentill's A Decline in Prophets (1930s), now The Pericles Commission by Gary Corby (Ancient Athens) and The Ghost of Waterloo by Robin Adair (1828)

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